Dangers in Products: Asbestos and Morcellators

Jul 19

It takes years of research and big funding before a pharmaceutical company finally comes up with a particular drug or product that will serve as a safe and effective treatment to a certain health condition. And before such drug or product becomes available in the market the U.S. Food and Drug Administration will need convincing results, proven through a series of tests funded by the pharmaceutical company itself, that it will provide safe and effective treatment.

Though it is highly important that medical products are efficient, their safety is of greater priority. This is why pharmaceutical companies can be held legally liable and mandated by courts to compensate those harmed by any medicine and/or pharmaceutical items that they produce which will be proven unsafe and the cause of severe medical conditions or death in some patients, instead of providing cure.

Over the past years a number of health products from giant pharmaceuticals have been linked to the development of either severe or life-threatening complications in patients. One example product is the morcellator, a medical device which, according to the law firm Williams Kherkher, is used to remove fibroids or other noncancerous growths during a hysterectomy or a myomectomy. Morcellators, however, are no longer uniformly recognized as safe and effective medical devices to perform these procedures.

Recently, the pharmaceutical company Johnson & Johnson recalled three of its power morcellators—the Morcellex Sigma, the Gynecare Morcellex, and the Gynecare X-Tract—following study results that demonstrated a significant correlation between the use of the devices and cancer growth. Due to this, morcellator lawsuits attorneys  are now investigating claims regarding the use of morcellators and cancer growth.

An equally dangerous cancer-causing product is asbestos, a highly elastic substance that is electricity, chemical, fire and heat resistant. It had earned the name “miracle substance” due to its superb characteristics, abundance, usefulness and cheapness. This special substance became widely used during the mid of the 20th century, usually mixed with other substances to make cement, generators, turbines, boilers, steam pipes, brakes and clutches, insulators, gaskets, hot water piping, furniture, appliances, construction materials and many other different things.

Asbestos’ remarkable usefulness made it a substance used in many parts of the globe. Many different types of workers have also been regularly exposed to it, including construction workers, electricians, firefighters, plumbers, processing plant workers, miners, shipyard workers, auto workers, machinists and many others.

The dangers presented by asbestos, especially lung damage, have been discovered as early as 1964; however, it was not until after the 1990s that its use was banned, but only in some countries. By 2002, as many as 730,000 asbestos lawsuits had been filed and about 8,400 companies sued by former employees whose works had direct and regular exposure to asbestos.

 

 

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